OKGenWeb
  Oklahoma Genealogy
 
   OKGenWeb Indian Pioneer Papers
   About 
Copies  Copyright  Index  Search  Submit  Transcribers
 
A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Indian Pioneer History Project for Oklahoma
Date: March 3, 1939
Name: Annie (Ann) Eliza Woodall Terrell Hendrix [(sic) Hendricks]
Post Office: Tahlequah, Oklahoma
Residence Address: Rt. 2, Box 162
Date of Birth: December 3, 1852
Place of Birth: Woodall Community, Cherokee Nation, IT
Husbands: Aaron Terrell, and Franklin Hendricks
Father: Andrew (Andy) Woodall
Place of Birth: GA
Information on father: died of smallpox at Fort Gibson Fort in 1863 <more>
Mother: Margaret (Peggy) Hendricks
Place of Birth: Cherokee Nation East, GA
Information on Mother: Blood: 1/2 Cherokee <more>
Field Worker: James S. Buchanan
Interview number: 13875

I was born December 3, 1852, on what was known as the Old Coody Place, later known as the Andrew Woodall Place, eight miles west of Tahlequah. My father was Andrew Woodall, white, and my mother was Margaret Hendrix [(sic) Hendricks] Woodall, daughter William and Susana {(sic) Susannah] Hendrix [(sic) Hendricks], Cherokees [(sic) William was white, Susannah was a full-blood Cherokee). Both of my parents were born in the Old Cherokee Nation; my mother was born in the year of 1822.

They (my parents) came to the Cherokee Nation with their parents with the expedition known as the Old Settlers of the Cherokees in 1831 (or 1832). My grandfather, William Hendrix [(sic) Hendricks), settled a claim about 1840 about six miles southwest of the town of Tahlequah which is now known as the Jim Gourd Place. The original log home has long ago passed out of existence, and only a part of the old stone chimney marks the site of this onetime comfortable pioneer home.

I was nine years of age at the outbreak of the Civil War, and the family was yet living at the Old Coody Place where I was born. My father and my oldest brother, Daniel Woodall, joined the Federal Cause, enlisting at Cane Hill, Arkansas, as there were no Federal forces at Fort Gibson at the beginning of the war. Later, the regiment that my father and brother, Daniel were with, was moved from Cane Hill to Fort Gibson, where Father was stricken with smallpox and died in 1862 (sic) 1863; and my brother, Daniel , served through the period of the war.

There was never any Nation of people divided against each other like the Civil War divided the Cherokees. At the beginning of the war, the Federal soldiers were taken away from the Cherokee Nation and left the Nation practically in the hands of the slave owners and all who were advancing the cause of the Confederacy; and the bitterness of feeling between the North and South extended throughout the Nation, as many of the Indians were wealthy slave owners and vehemently opposed any doctrine at variance with their traditional customs.

There had been a smoldering hatred existing between the political factions ever since before the movement of the Cherokees from the Old Cherokee Nation; and when the Civil War broke out, it only afforded an opportunity for the fire of this old feud to burst forth in all its fury. Practically all of the followers of the Ridge faction joined the Confederate cause, while the opposing faction, including the Kee-too-wah Clan, known as the "Pin" Indians, supported the Union side.

General conditions in the Cherokee Nation became so serious because of reprisals by each faction against the other, such as assassinations, robbing and burning of homes, etc., that the entire Nation became almost deserted, as the Confederate faction moved their families south to the Choctaw Nation; and those who supported the Union cause moved to Kansas, until very few families remained at their homes in the war-torn Nation.

My mother, my younger sister, and I remained at the old home during the entire period of the war, though the hardships were many. After the Federal troops, which Father and my brother, Daniel were with, moved from Cane Hill, Arkansas, to Fort Gibson and reoccupied that place, conditions in this immediate vicinity were not quite so bad, though Daniel took our younger brother, William, who was twelve years of age and kept him at the barracks at Fort Gibson to protect the boy from the Confederate soldiers as several boys near his age had been killed in the homes throughout the Nation.

The Confederate soldiers never molested us personally though they robbed our place of all cattle, hogs, chickens, and everything we had to eat and everything of any value.

After the Federal forces returned to Fort Gibson and established a Government commissariat, they issued rations to the few remaining families in the community who had been robbed of everything and had nothing to eat; and if it had not been for that relief by the Government, I don't know what would have become of us. Mother still had an old horse, due to the fact that he was so badly crippled up he was unfit for service in the War and they would not take him. Mother, my sister, and I would lead this old horse and go to Fort Gibson once a week, draw our rations; the soldiers would secure the pack on the horse, and then we would start on the long, weary journey back home, a round trip of about twenty-five miles.

In 1869, I was married to a Cherokee of the name of Aaron Terrell; and immediately after our marriage, we settled on a claim that had been partly improved before the War, and what improvements that had been made were destroyed during the War. We improved the place and made it our home for several years, and three children were born to us there. This marriage resulted in a separation about 1874; and in 1877, I was married to Frank Hendrix [(sic) Hendricks], (1/2 Cherokee, my uncle). Five children were born to that union, including George Hendrix [(sic) Hendricks], my oldest son with whom I am residing at this time. My husband Franklin Hendrix [(sic) Hendricks], died in 1884.



NOTES: Submitted by Alice Huitt Preston apres@dellepro.com , great-great niece of Annie Eliza Woodall Terrell Hendricks, July 2003.

Annie (Ann) Eliza Woodall Terrell Hendricks married Aaron Terrell, son of Moses Terrell and Rachel Parris, born 1850; she married Franklin H. Hendricks, son of William Hendricks Sr. and Susannah (Sokinny) Hendricks. She is listed on the 1880 Cherokee Nation Census: Tahlequah, 2464 as Eliza Ann Terrell; the 1890 Cherokee Nation Census: Tahlequah, 3565 as Ann Eliza Hendricks; 1894-96 Old Settler Payroll: Tahlequah, page 65 as Ann E. Hendricks (widow); the Dawes Roll: card# 2115, roll# 5489 as Annie E. Hendricks; Blood: 1/4 Cherokee. She donated the land for the Hendricks Cemetery, Woodall Community, southwest of Tahlequah, OK, where her parents: William Hendricks Sr. & Susannah (SoKinny) Hendricks were the first ones to be buried there. She is buried at the Hendricks Cemetery, also her 2nd husband Franklin Hendricks. She had the following brothers and sister: Daniel H. Woodall, William Woodall, and Caroline (Carrie) E. (Elva) Woodall who married John Beaver Post (my great-grandparents).

Aaron Terrell is listed on the 1851 Old Settler Roll: Tahlequah, 108 (1896 page 16); the 1880 Cherokee Nation Census: Tahlequah, 2463; the 1890 Cherokee Nation Census: Tahlequah, 2379; the 1894-96 Old Settler Payroll: Oaks, page 16; Blood: 1/8 Cherokee (by interpolation); Occupation: Between 1880-90, farmer.

Children of Annie (Ann) Eliza Woodall and Aaron Terrell are:

(1) Triphena Terrell, b. 1871, married (1) Unknown Bell, and married in 1903 at Tahlequah (2) John Martin Adair, b. June 03, 1858, at Fort Gibson, Cherokee Nation, IT, no children by Triphena, buried at the Hendricks Cemetery, also Triphena Terrell Adair. John Martin Adair served in Troop L., First US Volunteer Cavalry in the Spanish American War; this regiment was known as the "Rough Riders," his commander being Theodore Roosevelt. He is listed on the 1880 Cherokee Nation Census: Illinois, 29; the Dawes Roll: card # 2331, roll# 5793; Miller Roll: Ft. Gibson, OK, ap# 7907; Blood: 1/4 Cherokee, Education: Shurtleff College; Occupation: 1880, Farmer. [Note: See his interviews at the Indian Pioneer Papers.]

(2) Andrew Terrell b. 1873, died at the age of 10, buried at the Hendricks Cemetery; listed on the 1880 Cherokee Nation Census: Tahlequah, 2466.

(3) William "Ross" Terrell b. 1875; married Dula Hendricks, both buried at the Hendricks Cemetery. William "Ross" is listed on the 1880 Cherokee Nation Census: Tahlequah, 2467; 1890 Cherokee Nation Census: Tahlequah, 3567 as Ross Hendricks; Dawes Roll: card# 2110, roll# 5477; Blood: 1/4 Cherokee.


Franklin Hendricks b. 1837 is listed on the 1851 Old Settler Roll: Tahlequah, 139 (1896, p. 16); the 1880 Cherokee Nation Census: Tahlequah, 1026, "lives with Margaret Woodall" (his mother-in-law); and the 1890 Cherokee Nation Census: Tahlequah, 3564, Occupation: farmer; he is buried at the Hendricks Cemetery.

Children of Annie Woodall Terrell Hendricks and Franklin H. Hendricks are:

(1) Mary Ann "Mollie" Terrell? Hendricks, b. 1880; married Robert (Bob) Owens a stone mason from Wales, both buried at the Hendricks Cemetery. Mary is listed on the 1880 Cherokee Nation Census: Tahlequah, 2468 as Mary Terrell; 1890 Cherokee Nation Census: Tahlequah, 3568 as Maisie Hendricks; 1894-96 Old Settler Payroll: Tahlequah, page 63, 65 (actually just a "step" relation); Dawes Roll: card# 2113, roll# 5482 as Mary Owens; Blood 1/4 Cherokee.

(2) Susan "Susie or Sood" B. Hendricks, b. 1882, is listed on the 1890 Cherokee Nation Census: Tahlequah, 3569; 1894-96 Old Settler Payroll: Tahlequah, page 63, 65; Dawes Roll: card # 2100, roll# 27397 as Susan Cordray; Blood: 1/2 Cherokee. She married Anderson "Coop" Cooper, b. 1861, son of Wilson Cordery; listed on the 1880 Cherokee Nation Census: Illinois, 358 as Cooper Cordray; 1890 Cherokee Nation Census: Illinois, 2129 as Andrew Cordry; Dawes Roll: card# 2100, roll# 5440 as Andy Cordray; Blood: 1/4 Cherokee. They had the following children: Mary Belle Cordery, b. 1888, Dawes Roll: card# 2100, roll# 23243, Blood 1/8 Cherokee; Annie E. Cordery, b. 1891, Dawes Roll: card# 2100, roll# 23244, Blood: 1/8 Cherokee; and Cornell Cordery, b. 1893, Dawes Roll: card #2100, roll# 23245, Blood: 1/2 Cherokee. [(sic) I think that this should be 3/8 Cherokee.]

(3) George William Hendricks b. 1885, is listed on the 1890 Cherokee Nation Census: Tahlequah, 3570; 1894-96 Old Settler Payroll: Tahlequah, page 63, 65; Dawes Roll: card#2115, roll# 5490; Blood: 3/8 Cherokee.

(4)Richard F. B. Hendricks b. 1888, buried at the Hendricks Cemetery. Listed on the 1890 Cherokee Nation Census: Tahlequah, 3571; Old Settler Payroll: Tahlequah, page 63,65; Dawes Roll: card# 2115, roll# 5491; Blood: 3/8 Cherokee. Richard Franklin Boudinot Hendricks (called Robert F. Hendricks) married Nellie E. Matthews Hendricks, also buried at Hendricks; they had the following children: Charley M., Mary Ann Hendricks who married Herb Hendricks; William "Gunter," Richard Eugene "Dick," Clara Louise, Joyce Nell, Howard Earl, and Henry Franklin Hendricks.

(5) Delilah Hendricks, b. 1890; died at the age of seven; listed on the 1890 Cherokee Nation Census: Tahlequah, 3572 "3 mos. old."

Information on father: Fought with the 3rd Indian Home Guards, Civil War, USA; buried at the Fort Gibson National Cemetery, Fort Gibson, OK, Grave 2449, Section 3, Tombstone reads: 2449, AND'W WOODAL, KANSAS; died of smallpox at Fort Gibson Fort in 1863; Woodall Community southwest of Tahlequah, OK, is named after him and his wife.

Information on Mother: Blood: 1/2 Cherokee. One of 13 children born to William Hendricks Sr. & Susannah (Full Blood Cherokee) both buried at the Hendricks Cemetery, Woodall Community, southwest of Tahlequah, OK ( the cemetery is named after them). Gave land for the Woodall School to be built on which still exists; raised her family on her own after 1863; buried at the Hendricks Cemetery, Woodall Community, southwest of Tahlequah, OK, by her brother James R. Hendricks (there is no name on the tombstone).

 

OKGenWeb Notice: These electronic pages may NOT be reproduced in any format for profit or presentation by any other organization or persons. Presentation here does not extend any permissions to the public. This material may not be included in any compilation, publication, collection, or other reproduction for profit without permission.

The creator copyrights ALL files on this site. The files may be linked to but may not be reproduced on another site without specific permission from the OKGenWeb Coordinator, and their creator. Although public information is not in and of itself copyrightable, the format in which they are presented, the notes and comments, etc. are. It is, however, permissible to print or save the files to a personal computer for personal use ONLY.
 


All Rights Reserved

Updated:  08 Apr 2008